The Colonial Restaurant Review-Cool Things Chicago

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Le Colonial restaurant is a Chicago icon. Founded in 1996, this elegant French and Vietnamese establishment has been located in the heart of Chicago’s famous Gold Coast district on Rush Street for over 20 years. At that time, the restaurant occupied a former two-story Nagaya. At the beginning of 2019, the famous restaurant was moved. But it didn’t cross town or move to a completely different town. Instead, The Colonial moved to a location just off East Oak Street. Find out why your business moved from one location to another nearby, and examine the menu to see why it has become a favorite Vietnamese dining destination in Chicago’s ever-changing and growing desperate restaurant industry. Identify.

From Rush Street to East Oak Street

If you are lucky enough to have visited the Colonial at least once at their home Over 22 years on Rush Street You probably remember the comfortable seats on the second floor. The East Oak Street location has many elements that remind us of Rush Street, with the exception of the Cozy Upstairs. However, you’ll see a floor with decorative tile created by the same craftsman who polished all of the decor for the Colonial’s first home in Chicago. Why did they move in the first place? Joe King, co-owner of The Colonial, explains that the Rush Street location was “just too expensive to maintain,” which essentially had economic considerations. “Staying would mean paying three times the previous rent for the restaurant,” he adds. So King gave up on his own Mission Impossible to allow everyone to move in the immediate vicinity of where he remembers the Colonial’s existence. He also said that during the move, the location on East Oak Street “provides a good opportunity to refresh both the decor and the cuisine.”

Speaking of food …

when The Colonial When it opened, it was ahead of its time. Few downtown restaurants serve Vietnamese food. According to the restaurant’s national culinary director, Nicole Lutier, “it’s a big trend now… everyone has Vietnamese and vine flavors on the menu.” From day one, the cuisine therefore focuses on the 90s dinner. The idea was not to create a “fusion” version of Vietnamese cuisine according to taste. Instead, Rootier helped design a menu that permeated the family’s roots. She grew up in Vietnam and was half Vietnamese and half French, so the food she influenced had that cultural mix that she was familiar with, but there was an extra high-end approach. .. The end result is a menu that covers everything from small to large plates and includes side dishes.

Let’s take a look at the menu

Expect to find a source of meat, from shrimp, salmon and pork to chicken and beef. With the healthy help of vegetables, noodles, rice and sauces, you’ll see what awaits you at Colonial. All-day menu recommendations include chagio / crispy shrimp and pork rolls with Gulf shrimp, pork, Asian mushrooms, mint, cilantro, and cold lime sauce. There is Forbo / Hanoi Beef Noodle Soup with seasoned oxtail soup, rice noodles, leeks, bean sprouts, cilantro, and beef tenderloin slices. For a bigger appetite, you can order Ga Xao Xa Ot / Spicy Chicken Stir-Fry with Mirror Farm Chicken Breast, Turmeric, Lemongrass, Jarapenho, Ingen, Shiitake Mushrooms, and Thai Basil. Alternatively, you can choose Vine Xiao, which has a wide selection of rice noodles, bean sprouts, soy sauce, chicken, beef, shrimp, and tofu. Are you still hungry?

By the way, it’s something other than fast food

Of course, the colonial taste of the 1920s when it comes to decor and menus is a bit unusual for celebrations, but it’s also Give this place its own uniqueness It comes from the look and feel of everything you feel once inside the building. Quoc Luong, Executive Chef and Business Partner, points out that attention to detail extends from the front door to the kitchen and beyond. He’s especially proud of one menu item – prawns and pork chuzo / crispy spring rolls. Luon says it has something to do with the time it takes to prepare the meal. “The original authentic Chabio is wrapped in rice paper, but it takes a long time,” he adds. “Therefore, most restaurants have neither manpower nor manpower.” Routhier adds: “In general, Asian cuisine requires a lot of preparation. It is very laborious. On the contrary, our food should be more expensive. Again, this is Le Colonial. Is not a fast food restaurant.

What others have to say

This is Some comments posted online by reviewers Someone who’s been at the Colonial for a few weeks. “This place was spectacular! The atmosphere was very pleasant and very COVID friendly. Pho was delicious, the soup was just right. Their Vietnamese iced coffee is the best I have ever had and highly recommended. The chicken meatballs were so delicious I wanted to order two. The stir-fried chicken was very fresh and very complete! “Another reviewer said: From the moment we walked in the hostess made us feel very special. The best part of our overall experience was surprisingly tasty food. Brussels sprouts, shrimp spring rolls, and chicken curry come highly recommended. 10/10 experience! Will definitely be back! And another online reviewer makes it clear, “The Colonial is one of my favorite restaurants in Chicago. I ate pork ribs, baked chicken meatballs, and ducks. 10/10 All! The service is exceptional and the atmosphere is fun! ”

Overview

Located at 57 E. Oak Street in Chicago, The Colonial Restaurant is open daily from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. and serves lunch and dinner. If you haven’t tried Vietnamese cuisine and want to experience a meal that is as authentic as it gets in Chicago, go here. Not only do the service and decor impress you, the menu is also excellent. From business meals and casual dinners to family gatherings (with the right social distance), Le Colonial can meet your needs.

Le Colonial restaurant is a Chicago icon. Founded in 1996, this elegant French and Vietnamese establishment has been located in the heart of Chicago’s famous Gold Coast district on Rush Street for over 20 years. At that time, the restaurant occupied a former two-story Nagaya. At the beginning of 2019, the famous restaurant was moved. But it didn’t cross town or move to a completely different town. Instead, The Colonial moved to a location just off East Oak Street. Find out why your business moved from one location to another nearby, and examine the menu to see why it has become a favorite Vietnamese dining destination in Chicago’s ever-changing and growing desperate restaurant industry. Identify.


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